Home Start Here Screenwriting Cheat Sheet Film Analysis

What is the best online screenwriting software to use?

Where can I find the top screenwriting schools?

Can I get a screenwriting MFA?

What are the best schools for screenwriting?

What are the top screenwriting schools and film schools?

Contact Info

What is the best free online screenwriting course?

Mobile

Now, of course, a ‘unique voice’ doesn’t necessarily mean an accent or anything spoken. It can, but we’re talking more like how they speak, how they carry themselves. What makes them different than an average guy (or gal)? What makes them unique? What gives them their own unique voice?

Each (or at least most) of your supporting-characters should have a story-arc of their own. Bonus points if each of these sub-plots has its own three act structure.

The second act is where you’ll be doing most of your supporting-character work. The first act is mostly concerned with introducing everyone and getting the plot off and running, there’s usually not too much time for sub-plots. While the final 10 or 15 minutes of the

It’s so easy to focus all your time creating your screenplay’s main-character that you can completely forget about your minor and supporting-characters! Don’t make this mistake!

Your supporting-characters should be as interesting and fully-fleshed out as your protagonist. You should know their back-stories and personal-histories. You should be able to speak in their voices. And they should each have unique voices. All your characters should.

script is usually reserved for the big climatic scenes like the final-battle and the climax itself, leaving little more than a few seconds in the denouement. So, that leaves only a tiny bit of the first act, a tiny bit of the third act, and all of the second act for the majority of your supporting-characters and sub-plots to play out. Which is good, as second acts tend to be boring, so you’ll need a lot of distractions to keep audiences interested.

When you watch movies from now on, pay attention to how they introduce each character. Watch when they tell you the character’s name and how they do it. Watch how much backstory they give you in such a short amount of time (and space on a page). Watch how the relationships between the characters are subtly shown within each scene. Etc...

CLICK HERE to see our story-structure analysis of the film Breaking Away (1979)

Watch the scene above (from Armageddon).

Notice how much about each character the screenwriter gets across in just a line or two! One little scene, and it tells us everything about these guys’ characters.

A two-minute scene - with a dozen different characters - yet it still manages to be funny. It still manages to give each character a voice. It still manages to show us a little bit about each character, despite how little space the screenwriter had to do it in.

Take a look at how much the screenwriter tells us about these characters in even less time:

Writing Relatable Supporting-Characters for your Script or Screenplay: FORWARD The Supporting Cast of Characters!

Watch the opening of Breaking Away (1979), one of my all-time favourite films (and an Academy Award Winner for Best Screenplay). Actually, don’t just watch the opening, watch the whole movie. It’s that good.

Then, read our more detailed analysis of Breaking Away’s story-structure here.

After just the first scene, you the viewer, know just about everything about these guys. The screenwriter lets you know everything you need to know. Immediately.

You know that Dennis Quaid is the leader. You know that Daniel Stern is the shy, funny poet. You know that Dave is a champion cyclist who thinks he’s Italian. You know that Moocher is the runt of the litter. They live in a small town. They are old friends. Etc...

Breaking Away (1979) - Theatrical Trailer

Screen-Writing Contests:

Screenwriting 101:

PROPER SCREENPLAY FORMAT

SCREENWRITING SOFTWARE

SCREENPLAY TEMPLATE

SAMPLE SCREENPLAY PAGES

BEGINNER SCREENWRITERS

FILM SCHOOLS

SCREENWRITING DEGREES

SCREENPLAY STORY STRUCTURE

HOW LONG SHOULD EACH ACT BE?

THREE ACT STRUCTURE

START WRITING NOW

STORY-STRUCTURE TEMPLATE

THE FIRST TURNING POINT

THE SECOND TURNING POINT

PROTAGONIST’S CHARACTER-ARC

GET COVERAGE


The First Act of your Three-Act Structure. This is where you introduce your main characters to the audience and get the plot rolling. The end of your 1st Act comes with the First Turning Point, the point at which your protagonist chooses his quest The 2nd Act - Where the bulk of your plot goes. Confrontation - this is where your protagonist confronts the status quo and attempts to change it for the better Your 2nd Act can't end without your Second Turning Point! Things may seem bleak for your protagonist, but all is not lost yet! There is still hope!... Backstory - what happened in the past. Exposition, expository dialogue, etc... It all comes down to this - your climax! The end of your story. The conclusion. The one thing everyone in the audience wants to know: does the protagonist win? The 3rd Act - the final act in your three-act structure, where everything is decided, the climax, the conclusion, the end. Your Film's Theme - what your movie is really about. The undercurrent. The second act of your screenplay should be filled with ups and downs, dramatically speaking of course. Like a roller-coaster. It's all about creating conflict and drama. BACK Welcome to SCREENPLAY.today - your free online screen-writing program - learn how to write a screenplay for free! Free Online Screenplay Writing Course from SCREENPLAY.today - screenwriting advice, help, information, hints, tips & tricks