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chance to be funny and show the audience a bit about each person’s character. Which is why…

Meet-cute’s often lead to a clash of the characters’ personalities, in prototypically humorous ways. How often have you seen a romantic comedy where the two lovers absolutely despise each other right off the bat? Only to get thrown-together and later fall in love (before breaking up at the second turning-point, of course). What, pretty much every single one ever made?

But, the meet-cute isn’t reserved just for romantic-comedies! You can employ the same type of scene in pretty much any screenplay. And, it doesn’t have to be future-lovers meeting either. You can have two friends meeting-cute as well. Anyone that meets can meet-cute.

‘Meet-Cute’ is an old Hollywood term meaning that the protagonist and the love-interest meet in a really cute way. It’s a scene where you introduce your love-story in a really fun and audience-friendly manner. Just like it sounds.

Almost every romantic comedy has the soon-to-be lovers introduced in this way. It gives you a

As I’ve mentioned before, you want all your scenes to be cinematic. You want to treat every scene, no matter how small, as a short film. You want every scene to be interesting and engaging for the viewer. So, meeting-cute is really just an extension of this.

You can have your characters just meet - but that’s nowhere near as interesting as if they meet-cute (or meet-violently or meet-rudely or meet-unwillingly). There’s far more drama in those other types of meetings. So, if you are just writing a plain old meeting - try to make it interesting somehow? Can you make it cute? Can you make it funny? Scary? Thrilling? Exciting? Sexy? Whatever. Try to make all your scenes more than just plain, make them watchable.

Instead of just having your characters bump into each other in the hallway - maybe one’s carrying something dangerous he wants to hide, then spends the entire meeting trying to keep his body between the girl and the item, awkwardly. Maybe he mistakes her for someone else and says something unbelievably stupid (before realizing his mistake). Maybe he does something that would be really embarrassing if taken out of context - and she shows up right then.

In Titanic, they have one of the more dramatic meet-cutes: Leonardo DiCaprio first finds Kate Winslett’s character climbing over the edge of the ship - and about to commit suicide! Using humour and charm, he’s able to talk her down.

In When Harry Met Sally (1989), the main-characters meet by sharing a cross-country drive - where they get on each other’s nerves the entire way. It’s absolutely adorable:

Of course, your meet-cute doesn’t have to be heterosexual anymore! Hedwig and the Angry Inch, for instance, has a rather charming gay meet-cute between an East German teen and an American soldier sporting gummy-bears:

Meeting-Cute, the Only Way to Meet: Modern Meet-Cutes: FORWARD Boy Meets Girl, Awwww:  The Meet-Cute!

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The First Act of your Three-Act Structure. This is where you introduce your main characters to the audience and get the plot rolling. The end of your 1st Act comes with the First Turning Point, the point at which your protagonist chooses his quest The 2nd Act - Where the bulk of your plot goes. Confrontation - this is where your protagonist confronts the status quo and attempts to change it for the better Your 2nd Act can't end without your Second Turning Point! Things may seem bleak for your protagonist, but all is not lost yet! There is still hope!... Backstory - what happened in the past. Exposition, expository dialogue, etc... It all comes down to this - your climax! The end of your story. The conclusion. The one thing everyone in the audience wants to know: does the protagonist win? The 3rd Act - the final act in your three-act structure, where everything is decided, the climax, the conclusion, the end. Your Film's Theme - what your movie is really about. The undercurrent. The second act of your screenplay should be filled with ups and downs, dramatically speaking of course. Like a roller-coaster. It's all about creating conflict and drama. BACK Welcome to SCREENPLAY.today - your free online screen-writing program - learn how to write a screenplay for free! Free Online Screenplay Writing Course from SCREENPLAY.today - screenwriting advice, help, information, hints, tips & tricks