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In 2014, 88% of films had a male protagonist! So, this means that male-audience-goers typically identify with the protagonist (seeing as he’s likely male), while the female-audience-goers won’t have anyone to relate to.

This is why almost every movie opts for a love-interest. It’s an easy way to add (gender) diversity to your script and give the females in the audience someone to root for at the same time. A love-story basically allows Hollywood to perpetuate their gender stereotypes in an easy, straightforward manner. So, that’s what they go for. Every time.

I hope I will be able to teach you to write deeper stories that have no need for cheap tricks such as that. I hope you’ll be able to write love-stories that are natural and flow directly out of your main-stories.

Your screenplay doesn’t need a love-story. But, it also doesn’t hurt to have one at all.

For a century now, Hollywood executives have believed that, pretty much, only love-stories will bring females into theatres. So, seemingly every movie has one. Even testosterone-packed action flicks where love-stories are completely out of place and grind the action to a halt!

It’s not surprising that Hollywood films are cast as if they were actually a beauty contest (or porn-shoot for that matter)! It’s all about giving your audience what they want. Fulfilling their needs and desires. Well, we can’t fulfill their actual needs, so we’ll have to settle on their desires. We can fulfill those. Well, subconsciously at least. Which is why we are inundated with nothing but god-awful superhero movies and comic-book shows right now (and porn is literally everywhere). The producers are just giving us what we want. Even if we say we don’t want it. And, audiences typically want a love-story.  Men relate with the male-lead, and will want to see him sleep with the beautiful love-interest. And, women will be attracted to the male-lead and will fantasize about sleeping with him. So, everyone wants to see your characters get-together! And, vice-versa with a female-lead.

Having a love-story is good in other ways too, not just to titillate your audience. A love-story makes your story-structure more complicated. The lovestory adds another three-act structure - which gets superimposed on-top of your main story-structure. This gives your script depth. Instead of focusing on the main-story all the time, you can cut back and forth between two different stories.

A love-story can add drama too. For instance, with a love-story, you can have two different false-defeats, if you want. You have two different climaxes (no, not those types of climaxes, you dirty birdy!). Etc…

If you do decide to go with a love story, they usually follow a structure somewhat like this:

You’ll probably want almost everything in the love-story wrapped up before the final-battle and the climax. Other than the love-story’s denouement (and maybe its climax), of course. The protagonist can get the girl right before the final-battle/climax or just after. Either works. But, pretty much everything else should be wrapped up before.

Therefore, your love-story ends up mostly in the second act. With only little bits in the first or third acts.

If you are thinking about writing a love-story, it’s always good to go back and watch the best love-stories Hollywood has ever come up with.

Here are some of our favourites, you’ll want to watch:

Writing Your Screenplay’s Love-Story:Some Famous Love Story Movies You’ll Want to Watch:FORWARDThe Love Story

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The First Act of your Three-Act Structure. This is where you introduce your main characters to the audience and get the plot rolling. The end of your 1st Act comes with the First Turning Point, the point at which your protagonist chooses his quest The 2nd Act - Where the bulk of your plot goes. Confrontation - this is where your protagonist confronts the status quo and attempts to change it for the better Your 2nd Act can't end without your Second Turning Point! Things may seem bleak for your protagonist, but all is not lost yet! There is still hope!... Backstory - what happened in the past. Exposition, expository dialogue, etc... It all comes down to this - your climax! The end of your story. The conclusion. The one thing everyone in the audience wants to know: does the protagonist win? The 3rd Act - the final act in your three-act structure, where everything is decided, the climax, the conclusion, the end. Your Film's Theme - what your movie is really about. The undercurrent. The second act of your screenplay should be filled with ups and downs, dramatically speaking of course. Like a roller-coaster. It's all about creating conflict and drama. BACK Welcome to SCREENPLAY.today - your free online screen-writing program - learn how to write a screenplay for free! Free Online Screenplay Writing Course from SCREENPLAY.today - screenwriting advice, help, information, hints, tips & tricks